How to improve your open source code (2) - Function naming and size

This post was written during my trip through Iceland. It is part of a series on how to improve ones open-source code. Topics (will) contain programming style, habits, project planning, management and everything that relates to these topics. Suggestions welcome. Please note that this is totally biased and might not represent the ideas of the broad community. We’re slowly working ourselves up from if statements in the last episode of this article series to functions in this article.

Why I think about closing contributions to imag

This post was published on both my personal website and imag-pim.org. I’m thinking of closing contributions to imag since about two months. Here I want to explain why I think about this step and why I am tending into the direction of a “yes, let’s do that”. github is awesome First of all: github is awesome. It gives you absolutely great tools to build a repository and finally also an open source community around your codebase.

Please KDE, make your config syncable!

This article is a cry for a feature which is long overdue in KDE, in my humble opinion: Syncable, user readable (as in plain-text) configuration files. But let me start explaining where I come from. I started with Linux when I was 17 years old. At the time I ran an Kubuntu 9.04 (if I remember correctly) with KDE 3. I disliked Gnome because it looked silly to me (no offense, Gnome or Gnome people).

Why are some people stupid as _?

This post was written during my trip through Iceland and published much latern than it was written. Right now I’m sitting in front of our mobile home in Iceland, at the most western point of europe. We’ve had a great day here and the camping side (nothing more than a few square meters of grass, but enough to host 20-30 parties with tents or mobile homes) is nice.

Writing a Rust library crate for time calculating (1)

In this blog post, which might turn into a short series, I want to plan a rust library crate and write notes down how to implement it. This article was yet another one that I wrote while being on my trip through Iceland. As you can see - my head does never stop thinking about problems. Usecase So first of all, I want to write down the use case of this library.

How to improve your open source code (1) - if statements

This post was written during my trip through Iceland. It is part of a series on how to improve ones open-source code. Topics (will) contain programming style, habits, project planning, management and everything that relates to these topics. Suggestions welcome. Please note that this is totally biased and might not represent the ideas of the broad community. During my trip through Iceland I had a really great time seeing the awesome landscapes of Iceland, the Geysir, the Fyords and the Highlands.

Dear Iceland

Dear Iceland, this is not only a love letter, but also a letter which should give you moments of thought. I love you. Your nature is most beautiful, most astonishing, most cruel and also soft nature I have ever seen and I will likely ever see in my life. Your rivers, mountains, waterfalls and highlands are incredible. Your harsh winds keep one cold and shivering even if the sun burns. The sky looks more blue than anywhere in the world and the waters look more clean than air itself.

Three Spanish Boys in Iceland

This was written on 9th August, during my trip through Iceland. On this day we witnessed an accident of three young guys from Spain. They wanted to cross a river with their car, but got stuck and the car broke down. The complete car was in the river and drowned up to the steering wheel. After we pulled them out with our car (which thankfully has the right tools to pull 9 tons of weight) we noticed that the engine was broken.

Planning a log-functionality refactoring for imag

Here I want to describe how I plan to refactor the logging back end implementation for imag. This post was published on imag-pim.org as well as on my personal blog. What we have Right now, the logging implementation is ridiculously simple. What we do is: On every call to one of the logging macros, the log crate gives us an object with a few informations (line number, file, log message,…) - we apply our format, some color and write it to stderr.

The pain releasing a multi-crate project

Today I released version 0.3.0 of my imag project, which contains over 30 sub-crates in the project repository. This was pain in the ass (compared to how awesome the rust tooling is normally). Here I’ll explain why, hopefully triggering someone to make this whole process more enjoyable. There is no cargo publish –all Yep, you’ve read that right. I had to manually cargo publish each crate individually. This is even worse as it sounds!